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Elizabeth Warren Refuses to Say If Clinton Should Have Resigned Over Lewinsky Affair

Senator Elizabeth Warren on Wednesday said she wasn’t sure if former president Bill Clinton should have resigned in the wake of the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

Mika Brzezinski questioned Warren on whether or not Clinton “should … have left office after having an affair with a much-younger staffer in the White House?”

The Massachusetts congresswoman’s response was not at all definitive.

‘Uh, I don’t know,” Warren replied. “I can’t go back to litigate the 1990s. That one is beyond me.”

After the host suggested that perhaps Clinton’s inability to hold himself accountable over the affair is what led to the political atmosphere of today, Warren repeated her thought.

“Did the 1990s get us here though, to an extent?” Brzezinski queried.

“Of course it did and I don’t have the time machine to go back and change the 90s,” Warren responded. “All I can do is change this world going forward.”

Won’t Speculate

Odd how Warren is unwilling to discuss the past when she’s been more than willing to discuss whether or not President Trump should remain in office.

“By the time we get to 2020, Donald Trump may not even be president,” Warren said during an Iowa campaign event last month. “In fact, he may not even be a free person.”

Warren also suggested the 25th Amendment should be used to remove Trump from the White House.

“If they believe that Donald Trump cannot fulfill the obligations of his office — then they have a constitutional responsibility to invoke the 25th amendment,” she said.

Now suddenly she has cold feet commenting on something that led to Clinton’s impeachment on perjury charges for lying about his sexual relationship with Lewinsky over 20 years ago.

Not In Line With Another 2020 Candidate

Warren’s inability to denounce Clinton’s actions runs counter to another Democrat candidate in 2020 – Kirsten Gillibrand.

Gillibrand, after years of defending Hillary’s husband, took advantage of the #MeToo movement to finally admit that the former president should have resigned over the scandal.

When asked by the New York Times whether Clinton should have resigned over the affair, Gillbrand responded: “Yes, I think that is the appropriate response.”

Hillary, on the other hand, still not completely ruled out for another 2020 run, has defended her husband saying his affair with a much younger intern was “absolutely not” an abuse of power.

Considering reports have surfaced that presidential hopefuls are not seeking advice from Bill Clinton, Warren could have stood out by answering the question. But she couldn’t even stand on principle when it came to a tangible, impeachable offense by a President. Shameful.

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