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Atheists in TX Demand Crosses Be Down – Christians Have the Last Laugh!

When an atheist organization demanded that four Christian crosses on a county building in East Texas be taken down, a county judge and commissioners not only voted unanimously to keep them but illuminated them as an act of defiance.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) based in Wisconsin complained to public officials in San Jacinto County that the display of “Latin cross[es]” that adorn the courthouse violate the separation of church and state.

An “Action Alert” sent out by FFRF in early May read, “A concerned Coldspring resident reported to FFRF that San Jacinto County has the crosses up all year round and even lights the crosses during the holiday season.” FFRF asked members to “Tell San Jacinto commissioners to remove courthouse crosses.”

When a vote was held, things did not exactly go as FFRF had hoped.

“600-700 residents filled the Coldspring Community Shelter when the commissioners voted on the issue,” Breitbart reports.” Over 45 residents signed up to address the county officials at the meeting which felt like a revival, one speaker said.”

Then, one official posted a photo of the cross lit up on his Facebook.

Dwayne Wright, who serves as the county Republican chair, wrote, “THIS is how we roll in San Jacinto County! Not only did we not cower to the Wisconsin Whiners, we Lit Them Up!”

This is not the first time FFRF has harassed various locales over religious symbols.

“Several years ago, the organization told Hondo, Texas, it should take its iconic signs down. The signs in the community of 9,000 say, “Welcome. This is God’s Country. Please Don’t Drive Through It Like Hell,” Breitbart reports. “The mayor was reported to respond, ‘There’s no way in hell we’re going to take those signs down.’ The signs have existed since 1932 in the city just 40 minutes west of San Antonio.”

The group also targeted Orange, Texas officials for displaying a nativity scene, which the city eventually did to avoid the legal costs.

And what did that accomplish? Denying the citizens of that town a tradition they’ve had enjoyed for decades?

Wouldn’t FFRF be better off minding their own business? Wouldn’t we all?

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