New York City Mayor Eric Adams was interrupted before a crowd at Madison Square Garden before a New York Knicks game by a heckler shouting, “Shut the f*** up.”

Adams took the opportunity before the basketball game Monday to admire civil rights icon Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Thank you, New York. As we honor the life and times of Dr. King during some of the most difficult moments,” the new mayor stated.

“When the civil rights battle was on the line, Dr. King wanted the ball in his hand and he gave his life to ensure that our country would be a better place for all of us,” added Adams.

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Heckler Tells Adams to ‘Shut the F*** Up’

Video seems to suggest some in the crowd had no interest in the new Mayor’s words. One person can be heard shouting, “Shut the f*** up!” with scattered laughter among the crowd.

While wholly inappropriate considering the MLK holiday, the heckler may have noticed that Adams did slowly turn his brief comments to the crowd into what seemed like a campaign speech.

“Right now, we want the ball in our hand again as we deal with Covid, as we deal with crime, as we deal with uncertainty,” he said. “Let’s win this for team New York, for team America. Let’s take the ball.”

As his speech concluded, Mayor Adams received a round of applause from the crowd.

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Adams Off To Shaky Start

For those with high hopes for Eric Adams after replacing the supremely incompetent Bill de Blasio as mayor, things have gotten off to a less-than-assuring start.

After being interrupted by the heckler, Adams mentions how ‘team New York’ must ‘deal with crime.’

This, after 40-year-old Michelle Alyssa Go died over the weekend after being pushed onto the tracks of an oncoming train at a busy subway station.

Adams responded by saying even he doesn’t feel safe in his city’s subway system.

“On day one, I took the subway system, I felt unsafe. I saw homeless everywhere. People were yelling on the trains. There was a feeling of disorder,” the Democrat mayor explained.

Imagine what it feels like for those who use the subway system on a daily basis.

As one of his first acts as Mayor, Eric Adams allowed the “Our City Our Vote” legislation to become law, giving roughly 800,000 non-citizens the right to vote in local elections.

“I believe allowing the legislation to be enacted is by far the best choice, and look forward to bringing millions more into the democratic process,” Adams said.

Following his predecessor’s penchant for authoritarianism, Adams surprised New Yorkers by saying he would keep de Blasio’s vaccine mandate for private employers in place.

“The private sector employer mandate will stay in effect in the New Year, with a focus on compliance, not punishment,” health commissioner Dr. Dave A. Chokshi announced.

“Our focus is vaccine and testing, vaccine and testing, vaccine and testing,” Adams insisted.