President Trump celebrated his Nobel Peace Prize nomination Wednesday morning, tweeting several articles and congratulatory messages regarding the announcement.

Fox News reported that Christian Tybring-Gjedde, a member of the Norwegian Parliament, had submitted a nomination letter to the Nobel committee specifically citing the President’s efforts to deescalate worldwide conflicts.

“For his merit, I think he has done more trying to create peace between nations than most other Peace Prize nominees,” Tybring-Gjedde said in an interview with the network.

The honor comes just weeks after the President announced a “historic peace agreement” between the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Israel.

A joint statement at the time from Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the UAE’s Crown Prince, and the President, hopefully predicted the “historic diplomatic breakthrough will advance peace in the Middle East region.”

RELATED: President Trump Announces Historic Israel Peace Deal With UAE

Why Trump Deserves The Nomination …

Tybring-Gjedde, in his letter to the committee, believes the Israel-UAE agreement could be a blueprint for other countries in the Middle East.

“As it is expected other Middle Eastern countries will follow in the footsteps of the UAE, this agreement could be a game-changer that will turn the Middle East into a region of cooperation and prosperity,” he writes.

Aside from a historic peace agreement in the traditionally hostile region, Trump has a thick resume on resolving conflicts and nudging nations to cooperate and make deals.

Trump, Tybring-Gjedde explains, played a “key role in facilitating contact between conflicting parties and … creating new dynamics in other protracted conflicts, such as the Kashmir border dispute between India and Pakistan, and the conflict between North and South Korea, as well as dealing with the nuclear capabilities of North Korea.”

Additionally, he notes the administration’s just-announced efforts to withdraw thousands of troops from Afghanistan and Iraq, comparing him to Nobel winner Jimmy Carter.

“Trump has broken a 39-year-old streak of American Presidents either starting a war or bringing the United States into an international armed conflict,” he beamed.

A recent ad created by ‘Walk Away‘ Democrats notes that “Trump is – by a mile – the anti-war candidate” in the 2020 election.

This nomination helps solidify that claim and draws a distinct line in the sand between Trump and the pro-war Biden-Obama years.

RELATED: Watch: Trump Campaign Delivers Devastating Ad Touting ‘Walk Away’ Democrats

… And Obama Didn’t

A press release in 2009 announced that Barack Obama had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, leaving many scratching their heads.

Obama, according to the committee, had earned the award based on “his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples,” though he had only been in the White House mere weeks when he was nominated.

Essentially, he had been awarded the prize based entirely on his media popularity and the thought of what he could be as a leader, not based on anything he actually did.

Ex-Nobel secretary, Geir Lundestad, admitted that awarding Obama was a mistake.

“Even many of Obama’s supporters believed that the prize was a mistake,” Lundestad wrote on his memoir. “In that sense the committee didn’t achieve what it had hoped for.”

Tybring-Gjedde, a four-term member of Parliament who also serves as chairman of the Norwegian delegation to the NATO Parliamentary Assembly, agrees even though he isn’t a supporter of President Trump.

“The committee should look at the facts and judge him on the facts – not on the way he behaves sometimes,” he said. “The people who have received the Peace Prize in recent years have done much less than Donald Trump. For example, Barack Obama did nothing.”

Worse than nothing, Obama had very few diplomatic achievements, would allow terrorism to flourish throughout the Middle East, and would become the longest wartime president in history, expanding conflicts into several countries like Libya and Syria.

Peace wasn’t Obama’s strength, yet he won the coveted prize. It would further tarnish the committee’s reputation if the President failed to win.