A new report indicates the Washington Post, which had been awarded the Pulitzer for their 2017 coverage of Donald Trump and the ‘Russia collusion’ narrative, has quietly edited at least 14 articles that relied on the discredited Steele dossier.

Earlier this week, The Political Insider reported that the Post removed and corrected large portions of two articles from 2017 and 2019 that sourced the dossier.

The move comes several years too late and coincides with news that another key player in the dossier’s ‘research’ had been arrested.

While the newspaper whose official slogan is “Democracy dies in darkness” came clean in those two pieces, Fox News reports that they’ve been quietly editing numerous other articles.

RELATED: Washington Post Removes And Corrects Years-Old Articles That Used Discredited Steele Dossier, Axios Says Media Experiencing A Reckoning

Washington Post Corrects Steele Dossier Articles

Fox News is reporting that the Washington Post has “added editor’s notes to at least 14 other reports” that used the Steele dossier as some level of source.

They suggest that the corrections have simply “popped up in other Washington Post articles.”

The latest editor notes, as with the initial two, reference a Belarusian American businessman named Sergei Millian who had been previously cited as a key source in the Steele dossier.

The information in question, according to the Washington Post’s media reporter Paul Farhi, had more likely come “from a Democratic Party operative with long-standing ties to Hillary Clinton” in light of the indictment of Igor Danchenko, described by the New York Times as “the primary researcher of the so-called Steele dossier.”

The editor’s note is being applied to many past articles with only the date changing based on the original article.

One such article from March of 2017 reads:

“An earlier version of this story published March 29, 2017, referred to previous reporting in The Washington Post that Belarusan-American businessman Sergei Millian had been a source of information for a dossier of unverified allegations against Donald Trump. In November 2021, The Post removed that material from the original 2017 story after the account was contradicted by allegations in a federal indictment and undermined by further reporting. References to the initial report have been removed from this piece.”

The articles edited range from 2017 to 2019 – nearly three years’ worth of reporting that remained published on the Washington Post website right up until last week.

RELATED: Durham’s Russia Probe Nabs A Big Fish – ‘Primary’ Figure In Steele Dossier Flap Arrested

Politico Reporter Mocks The Post

Politico columnist Jack Shafer jabbed at the Washington Post for the way in which they handled corrections to reports referencing the Steele dossier.

“So when reporters uncover new information that undermines earlier copy, they write new stories, updating the record,” Shafer explained. “What they don’t do is go back and erase the original, flawed version. But that’s what the Washington Post did last week.”

Axios called for a media reckoning over the false reporting on the Steele dossier.

“It’s one of the most egregious journalistic errors in modern history,” they wrote, but “the media’s response to its own mistakes has so far been tepid.”

Far-left media outlets such as CNN and MSNBC have remained largely silent in the wake of the Steele dossier and Russia collusion reporting falling apart.

Brian Stelter, CNN’s media hall monitor, has not mentioned the Washington Post’s corrections despite hosting a show called ‘Reliable Sources’ that purportedly covers the media industry.

CNN’s viewers, according to Fox News, “would be clueless” about a major news story being corrected “because ratings-challenged host Brian Stelter shockingly ignored it.”

“Hey motherf***er, you’re supposed to be a journalist,” Joe Rogan famously declared.

 

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