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Gowdy Rips into Professor at Committee Policing Strategies Hearing: Justice Should Be THIS!

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Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC) went off at a House Judiciary Committee on policing strategies within the communities they serve, pointing out that “all lives matter” and that there is currently a process to deal with incidents involving law enforcement.

The hearing was designed to explore “police accountability, aggression towards law enforcement, public safety concerns related to these issues, and solutions to address these problems,” and featured such guest speakers as outspoken Eric Holder critic Sheriff David Clarke and Northeastern University Professor Deborah Ramirez.

Ramirez particularly drew the ire of Gowdy, as he laid out a list of names of police officers killed in the line of duty, followed by a list of intra-racial homicides, repeatedly asking the professor if she had heard of these people.

“No,” was her constant reply.

Gowdy added that the case of a Kevin Carper was most instructive, as “his partner did CPR on the suspect that killed him, trying to save his life.”

He pointed out that there were no protests for either the police or intra-racial shootings.

Then he nailed Ramirez with this observation:

“I suspect you agree with me professor, that all lives matter. Whether you’re killed by a police officer or your next door neighbor, you’re every bit as dead aren’t you?”

Ramirez consistently made this face during the barrage of questions:

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Gowdy went on to express his desire to have a “justice system that is color blind” on both sides of the scale.

“I want us to get to the point where we lament the death, the murder, of a black female like Nell Lindsey, just as much if it is at the hands of an abusive husband – which it was – as we would if it had been at the hand of a white cop.”

Isn’t that the kind of justice we should all be seeking?

Do you agree with Trey Gowdy, don’t all lives matter when it comes to the relationship between police and community?

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