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Trump’s Lawyers Say Comey Leaked Info for Months

The liberals who believed that former FBI head James Comey somehow tried to influence the election in Donald Trump’s favor should have had those beliefs destroyed during his testimony last week.

There was plenty we learned about Comey in his own words – and it was clear that he had a staunch distrust of Trump, going as far as to say that he took extensive notes of his conversations with Trump because he “didn’t trust” him. Comey took no such notes during his meetings with Barack Obama – or during the three-hour meeting he had with Hillary at her house the weekend before the FBI let her off the hook.

Most shocking of all, we learned that it was Comey himself who “leaked” the memo of his claiming that Trump had requested that the FBI’s investigation into Michael Flynn be dropped. The claim wasn’t true – and if he wanted to, Trump could’ve just granted Flynn a pardon anyway. There would be no point in asking Comey to end the case.

Even more disturbing, however, wasn’t that Comey admitted to being the leaker (which Trump’s lawyer is suggesting was illegal), it’s that it likely wasn’t his only leak.

President Trump’s legal team may be prepared to show a trail of leaks to The New York Times by former FBI Director James Comey – dating back to at least March – in a pair of complaints set to be filed to the Justice Department inspector general and Senate Judiciary Committee, a source close to the team told Fox News.

An independent Fox News review of The New York Times’ reporting dating back to January reveals a host of stories sourced from top FBI and DOJ officials – or those privy to their conversations – that either paint Comey in a positive light or push a message he was unable to personally disclose.

Fox cited specific examples on January 10th, 24th, February 24th, March 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, April 22nd, and lastly on May 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th and 16th.

Comey admitted to using an ex-U.S. attorney, later identified as Columbia University Prof. Daniel Richman, to leak to The Times the contents of alleged memos Comey wrote about his one-on-one interactions with Trump. He was not asked if he had ever used Richman on other occasions; however, Richman is mentioned in 151 results in a New York Times search dating back to 1993, with 11 of those articles also featuring Comey and six of them being authored by Michael S. Schmidt – who later wrote the “Comey memos” story which Comey told Congress he directed Richman to leak.

H/T Fox News

President Trump also has a hunch that Comey leaked more than just a memo.

If anything, this should confirm that our suspicions were right all along when Comey let Hillary Clinton off the hook at the conclusion of the FBI’s investigation into her shady email practices. Comey was no friend of Trump at any point – and when he was President, Comey turned up the heat.

What do you think about this? Is Comey more guilty than we know? Tell us your thoughts in the comment section below!