Quantcast
Skip to main content



This site works best in IE9 and up and in other modern web browsers

Two Glaring Contradictions Arise From Kavanaugh Accuser’s Polygraph Letter

They probably should have withheld everything.

White House reporter for the Washington Post, Seung Min Kim, posted on social media that lawyers for Christine Blasey Ford would, “under no circumstances,” hand over medical records and therapist notes applying to their client to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

She did, however, send them the results of her polygraph test.

A polygraph test is designed to root out liars, and it may have done just that, though inadvertently.

Two items stand out.

In the handwritten notes, Ford indicates that the party in which she alleges Kavanaugh assaulted her, there were in attendance “4 boys and a couple of girls.”

In her letter to Senator Diane Feinstein, Ford specifically stated, “The assault occurred in a suburban Maryland area home at a gathering that included me and 4 others.”

Now, even using Common Core math, those numbers don’t match up. So how many people were at the party – five, six, or even seven if she isn’t including herself in the polygraph letter? And better yet, the polygraph supposedly indicates she’s telling the truth which, if that is the case, means she was lying in the Feinstein letter.

Charles Cooke, an esteemed author at the National Review, helps to visualize the contradiction:

The polygraph letter is dated August 7th, while the Feinstein letter was written on July 30th. She couldn’t remember how many people were at the party in a one week span, but we’re supposed to believe she’s relaying accurate information from the ’80s?

Another major problem leaps out in reading this release.

In her letter to Feinstein, she closes by informing the congresswoman that, “I am currently vacationing in the mid-Atlantic until August 7th and will be in California after August 10th.”

The polygraph examination was administered on the 7th when she indicates she will still be in the mid-Atlantic. The location of that same-day examination – Linthicum Heights, Maryland.

Assuming she somehow made her way from the mid-Atlantic to Maryland on the same day, there seems only one likely mode of travel – by air.

What’s the problem with that, you might ask? It’s not preposterous to assume she made that flight.

It is preposterous if you’ve been telling the media that you’re afraid to fly, specifically because of your supposed experience with Kavanaugh.

CNN reports:

Two longtime friends of Ford’s told CNN this week that she has previously described feeling uncomfortable — even struggling — when she is in enclosed spaces without an “escape route” or more than one exit door, and suggested that this discomfort stemmed from the alleged encounter with Kavanaugh.

This was the reason that Ford did not enjoy flying, (Kate) DeVarney said — an airplane was “the ultimate closed space where you cannot get away.”

She asked the Committee to push the hearing until Thursday due to the fact she would have to drive from California to Washington, D.C. because of her fear of flying.

Did she drive from the mid-Atlantic to Maryland to have her polygraph administered? Seems unlikely considering a little thing known as the ocean.

Keeping up with the lies coming out of Ford’s camp is becoming tedious.