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Christmas Celebrations Across Iraq and Syria After ISIS Defeat

There was a sight to be seen in the territory previously held by ISIS (i.e. all of it) in Iraq and Syria last Christmas season: Christmas celebrations in the Muslim-majority nations.

With the Trump administration declaring an end to our involvement in Syria, now is a good time to reflect.

Christians were supposedly previously permitted to live “in humiliation” (their words) while paying the Jizya, a tax on Christians in Muslim lands. For those who can’t afford (or wouldn’t) pay, it’s convert or die. Given the tens of thousands of Muslims whom ISIS has killed, it goes without saying that most chose not to live under ISIS rule in any circumstances, and 90% of Iraq’s Christians were displaced. Roughly half of Syria’s Christians have fled since 2011.

With the terror group decimated (though given that “decimation” literally means losing 10% of your soldiers, that’s an understatement), Christians can finally practice their faith openly and freely once again in the areas previously controlled by the group.

Here are some of the photos and videos:

Baghdad, Iraq: 

Mosul, Iraq (ISIS “capital” in Iraq):

Aleppo, Syria:

Raqqa, Syria (ISIS “capital” in Syria):

The scenes out of Raqqa, in particular, make an angry tweet from a liberal in May of 2016 seem quite hilarious. The woman who posted it was angrily responding to Judge Jeanine Pirro, who tweeted out a quote from Donald Trump that “we’ll be saying Merry Christmas” again.

“Do you live in Raqqa, Jeanine? No? Then you’ve always been able to say Merry Christmas.” Here’s the tweet (WARNING: Explicit Language):

Well, good thing that problem was taken care of!

A brief sobering aside: The end of the ISIS “caliphate” doesn’t mean the end of ISIS. Their remaining members will be absorbed into other terror groups, and the groups lingering ideology will continue to inspire lone wolfs globally.

That being said, at their peak, nearly 10 million people lived under ISIS rule. That number has since fallen to essentially zero, and that’s nothing to downplay.

Share this story to show others Christmas is being celebrated in the Middle East again!

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