Maura McGarvey and Michael Ricci felt their daughter Caitlyn needed some tough love.  Their daughter had issues with teenage drinking. Concerned about her future, the divorced parents wanted to provide their daughter with what they felt was much needed structure.

After high school, they enrolled Caitlyn in a college program where alcohol was prohibited to students under 21. According to her mom’s blog, it only took Caitlyn three weeks to get expelled. Caitlyn then returned home with the guidelines that she work full time and take three summer classes at a community college. Not wanting to attend summer classes, Caitlyn packed her bags and moved.

Then, Caitlyn sued her parents to pay for out of state college tuition. And she won. Her parents are now legally obligated to pay for $16,000 of her tuition at Temple University. The parents haven’t seen Caitlyn outside of the courtroom for the past two years.

 “It is nice to see that she is alive and doing well, but it is hurtful because she wouldn’t look at us. When I got emotional in the courtroom and when Michael got emotional in the courtroom, she doesn’t have any emotion.”

Michael Ricci said that he will refuse to pay and will risk being held in contempt of court. The parents are upset that they didn’t even have the option of asking their daughter to attend an in state school with cheaper tuition. They have no voice in the matter according to a New Jersey law.

The parents are now working with state legislators to attempt to reverse this law which gives divorced parents no recourse to entitled adult children who still demand their parents support their lifestyle.

McGrath has spoken of her daughter’s sense of entitlement and complete lack of accountability on her blog.

 “I have been following Caitlyn’s activity for the past year and a half via Twitter and Instagram, as that is the only way I can be apprised of what she is doing. I am worried that she still has not learned her lesson about alcohol consumption, as prior to turning 21 last week, she often posted about tailgating at concerts and college parties, and once again I find myself fearful for her future. While suing me to pay for her tuition, she purchased a brand new car. She posts pictures of her manicures and new outfits from high-end retail shops. She got a tattoo. She complains about her professors. She complains about her job. She has learned that there are no consequences for her actions. She has learned that if she doesn’t get her way, she can sue. I am worried that without any parental guidance, she will continue on this path that I know will not end well for her.”

Adult children can sue their parents to pay for their college tuition. And the State of New Jersey has proven it will side with entitlement over responsibility.

How do you think someone with a clear sense of entitlement will adjust to fit into a professional work environment?

 

 

 

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