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5 Times the President Said We “Need a Strategy” to Fight Terrorists

Despite having had war declared against the United States by ISIS, the President yesterday admitted that he simply doesn’t have a strategy to deal with the terrorist group just yet.

The admission was startling to a nation that had heard Obama repeatedly remind them of the need for a strategy to combat terrorism over the years.

Here are some examples of that…

  • In a speech about the way to move forward in Afghanistan and Pakistan over four years ago, Obama declared that we “need a strategy” to prevent the cancer of terrorism from spreading in those countries.
  • Last year, the President remarked that America’s resilient spirit needs to be emulated and that we “need a strategy” to face down the dangers of al Qaeda.
  • In discussing cyber-terrorism, Obama stated that “We need a strategy that uses all of the tools of the U.S. power in a coordinated fashion, but more importantly, we need to hold our agencies accountable for implementing that strategy.”
  • During a foreign policy speech as a candidate for President in 2008, Obama announced that it was “time to once again shape a new security strategy for an ever-changing world” in order to fight terrorism.
  • During his most recent West Point speech, the President addressed “the most direct threat to America” – terrorism – saying “We need a strategy that matches this diffuse threat.”

Apparently that direct threat doesn’t warrant an in-place strategy now.

Perhaps Sarah Palin was prescient once again when she made these comments six years ago (via the Denver Post):

Just days after Obama’s (2008 acceptance) speech, the Republican vice presidential nominee took a dig at the setting.

“But when the cloud of rhetoric has passed, when the roar of the crowd fades away, when the stadium lights go out and those Styrofoam Greek columns are hauled back to some studio lot, when that happens, what exactly is our opponent’s plan?” asked Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin.

Those columns are gone. Those crowds have faded away. Those lights have gone out.

America is still awaiting a plan, awaiting a strategy, and awaiting for their Commander-in-Chief to finally start acting like a leader against this very serious threat.

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